A Year in Pictures – Art Muse LILY takes Life in her Stride

Lily, star of many drawings by artist Jane Lee McCracken reveals a year in her life as an art muse, what she will be eating for dinner this Christmas and her special Christmas wish.

LILY CALENDAR DECEMBERLILY CALENDAR

IMG_0089January – “I love snow! I like to run at it with my mouth open like a snow plough so I can eat as much of it as I can in one go.”

IMG_4595February – “This is one of my favourite drawings where I got a big starring role as the white wolf. I liked modelling this cool i-pad cover too!”

20130906_215602 (1)March –  “Early rehearsals began for this year’s nativity! (I put my ears back when I’m happy so could wear Mary’s headscarf with ease)”

IMG_0474April –  “I have to do a lot of sitting around during modelling shoots.  I just go to sleep and boom wake up for the camera”

IMG_8913May –  “In my recreational time I love to lie in the garden amongst the flowers and sleep.  I often dream about rabbits and barking at other dogs”

IMG_1098June –  “I love to go to the pub, particularly the beer garden of the Olde Ship in Seahouses, Northumberland”

IMG_1231July –  “This year I was centre stage in an exhibition at The Mercer Art Gallery, Harrogate, England and went down to trip the light fantastic and meet the people of Harrogate who were very nice”

IMG_7296August-  “Summer brings clover and I love to lie in it and pretend to catch bees!”

IMG_1264September-  “This is the year that I learnt to open the back door and let myself in and then I wanted to let myself out again as the football was on!”

IMG_4665October –  “Cuddling my playmate is a very important part of my daily routine and now the mornings are dark I find it increasingly difficult to get out of bed for walks, I’d rather just have hugs”

IMG_4413November –  “Atka’s my pin-up boy, I’d love to meet him one day!”

LILY CALENDAR DECEMBERDecember –  “My friend Joe Bason made me this Christmas bow-tie, isn’ it gorgeous?! I love wearing it when I go to the shops with my owner, it goes with my Red Dingo collar! (Thank you also to my friend Juliet of KimonoKraft Love you Long Time http://www.etsy.com/uk/shop/KimonoKraft for being the inspiration behind my calendar!)

So Lily what will you be eating for Christmas this year? –

“I just can’t resist it, I’ll be having a bowl of my favourite food, Chappie and then a whole Dentastick after my owners have eaten their Christmas dinner.  But probably when they’re not looking my Granny and Auntie Karen will sneak me roast potatoes and maybe some Haribo Starmix as I love them!”

Have you got any special Christmas wishes? – “My owners bought me from a breeder who didn’t tell them that Northern Inuits can never be left on their own, plus they didn’t do enough research about my breed before they bought me.  I’m lucky, they love me very much, but it’s hard work making sure that I’m cared for 24 hours a day.  I get very distressed if I’m left on my own.  If you can’t give proper care to specialist breeds like me give a rescue dog who’s not a Diva a loving home instead.”

LILY CALENDAR HOWLING 2

Sponsored by http://www.dogonthepitch.co.uk/

Dogonthepitch wordpress

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‘ATKA’, Ambassador Wolf Art PRINT – Wolf Conservation Center, NY

'Atka', signed and numbered luxury Archival Pigment Print

‘Atka’, 2013 Luxury Archival Pigment Print by Jane Lee McCracken

Prints of ‘Atka’, Ambassador Wolf of the Wolf Conservation Center, NY are now available to order with ALL profits donated to WWC, helping to protect wolves.

Luxurious Archival Pigment Prints on Hahnemühle Photo Rag 308gsm from the original Biro drawing of ‘Atka’ by artist Jane Lee McCracken are especially made to order crafted by prestigious photographer and printmaker http://mrjacklowe.com/ one of the best printmaker’s in the UK.

To purchase an ‘Atka’ print or for further information:

www.janeleemccracken.co.uk/shop/conservation art prints

'Atka', detail of black Biro drawing, 2013

‘Atka’, 2013, detail of black Biro drawing by Jane Lee McCracken

Magnificent Atka has dedicated his life to educating people about protecting his wild brothers and sisters. Wolves in America are having a bit of a hard time and need all the help they can get.  

That’s why the original Biro drawing of ‘Atka’ was created and winged its way from Newcastle, England to New York State for WCC Wine and Wolves fundraiser on 12th December 2013.  Since 1999 WCC has been teaching people about wolves and their role in the environment.

If you’re not familiar with WCC already, have a look at the sterling work they do for wolves http://nywolf.org/

'Atka' Ambassador Wolf, photo courtesy of WCC

‘Atka’ Ambassador Wolf, photo courtesy of WCC

From Moscow with Love

'The Russian Doll', red, blue, green and black Biro drawing, 2008 by Jane Lee McCracken

‘The Russian Doll’, red, blue, green and black Biro drawing, 2008 by Jane Lee McCracken

The Russian Doll… Back in my home town of Edinburgh in 2005, with money in my pocket and a premeditated mission to visit ‘The Russian Shop’, my target was a Russian doll and successful return to Northumberland the same day with my own matryoshka.

The little shop on St Mary’s Street just off the High Street was overflowing with an impressive array of magnificent Russian dolls, lacquer boxes and wooden toys.  I wanted a special doll, something unique.   All the dolls were wearing coats of glistening varnish, except one which had a matt finish – she had the prettiest face, and on her body was a representation of Ivan Shishkin’s painting ‘Morning in a Pine Forest’, 1889. All her children had Russian landscape paintings on their bodies too and the same pretty face as their mother.  This was my doll!

Russian doll and her four children on 'The Wolf's House', mixed media, 2012, by Jane Lee McCracken

Russian doll and her four children on “The Wolf’s House”, mixed media, 2012, by Jane Lee McCracken

I took her to the counter to pay and the shop owner pointed to a woman I had noticed earlier who was sitting at a small desk painting a lacquer box. “This is the artist who made your doll, she has just flown in from Moscow this morning to give a demonstration of her work”.  Such excitement, such a lovely, gentle woman, we spoke to one another about her art and like a child holding out an autograph book to a living legend, I held out my dolI and asked if she would sign a dedication. “To Jane, with Love, 2005” it says.

'All I have left', 2001

“All I have Left”, 2001

Found objects and my own possessions feature a lot in my work.  I love the simplicity of using what is close at hand, a Biro, my dog Lily, objects I find on Ebay.  Working on  a series of drawings from 2008 called ‘Tales from the East’, I wanted to employ the iconic image of the Russian doll and create my own doll.  I used my Russian/Scottish doll as inspiration and a photograph from 2001 of myself, that was made for a series of digital montages called ‘All I have Left’ .

"Red Riding", All I have left' 2002, digital montage

‘”Red Riding”, All I have Left Series’ 2002, by Jane Lee McCracken, digital montage using artist’s photograph of the Black Forest

Like all my work, the drawing of “The Russian Doll” made with red, blue, green and black Biro acts on several levels and is symbolic of issues relating to war.  The self-portrait layered over the doll’s face, represents ordinary women “like you and me”.

For further information about the symbolism of this piece please visit my website: :http://www.janeleemccracken.co.uk/photo_4657711.html

Luxury Archival Pigment Prints crafted by http://mrjacklowe.com/  are available from my shop:http://www.janeleemccracken.co.uk/photo_8181965.html

'The Russian Doll', Archival Pigment Print

“The Russian Doll”, Archival Pigment Print series

175 Steps with Patrick Leigh Fermor

'R and Lily bookmark and "Between the Woods and the Water"

‘R and Lily bookmark and “Between the Woods and the Water”

Sighișoara, Transylvania, 31 August, 2008 … Have brought Patrick to be reunited with Angéla.  He’s in my bag!  As our feet touch the first step of the Scholars’ Stairway, a wooden covered staircase built in 1642 boasting 175 steps which lead to the ‘School on the Hill’ … we notice the sweetest old woman crowned in a floral headscarf, shyly concealed behind the ornate entrance.  She is holding a basket with four of the rosiest, plumpest apples (Snow White would have discarded the wicked Queen’s offering as windfall on first gaze of these!). She is selling them just as others are standing on the streets of the beautiful Saxon citadel, trading their house hold possessions or fruit from their garden, all swallowed by a cerulean sky. Not meaning to offend we give her lei and leave her the apple she offers so she can sell it to someone else and make more money.  As she begins to understand our international mime, she smiles the warmest toothless smile and thanks us – “mulţumesc”.  The steps are hard work, too many Vogue cigarettes!  I’m on the steps finally after dreaming of seeing what you saw! The sun is setting as we reach the top of the staircase.  The ‘Church on the Hill’ welcomes us too.  The gravestones are on fire.  I take out ‘Between the Woods and the Water’, Patrick Leigh Fermor from my bag and read pages 156-158.  But it’s page 154 that I’ve marked with a photo of R and Lily…”

'The Scholars Staircase', Sighisoara, 2008

‘The Scholars Staircase’, Sighisoara, 2008

‘We put up at an inn with gables and leaded windows in a square lifted high above the roofs and the triple cincture of the town wall and dined at a heavy oak table in the Gastzimmer.  The glasses held a cool local wine that washed down trout caught that afternoon, and every sight and sound – the voices, the wine-glasses, the stone mugs and the furniture shining with the polish of a couple of centuries – brought it closer to a Weinstube by the Rhine or the Necker.  When István retired, Angéla and I sat on in the great smokey room holding hands, deeply aware that it was the last night but one of our journey.  There are times when hours are more precious than diamonds.  The gable-windows upstairs surveyed a vision of unreality.  The moon had triumphed over the mute fireworks to the east and the north and all the dimensions had been re-shuffled.  We lent on the sill, and when Angéla turned her head, her face was bisected for a moment, one half silver, the other caught by the gold glow of lamplight indoors.’ (“Between the Woods and the Water”, p 154)

Balasha Cantacuzene (Angéla), Romanian Princess

Balasha Cantacuzene (Angéla), Romanian Princess

"Sighisoara", 2008

“Sighisoara”, 2008

"R, Ciuc beer and ceramic candleholder of the Shoemaker's House, Sighisoara", 2008

“R, Ciuc beer and ceramic candleholder of the Shoemaker’s House, Sighisoara”, 2008

Our trip to Romania in 2008 in the footsteps of Patrick Leigh Fermor had a profound affect on me and I began my own journey making a series of work called “Tales from the East” upon our return.  “The Cupboard” a drawing from this series, was of a painted corner cupboard in the Szekély style that furnished the blue cottage we stayed in at Micloșoara, Transylvania.

"The Cupboard", black Biro drawing, 2009 by Jane Lee McCracken http://www.janeleemccracken.co.uk/photo_4657731.html

“The Cupboard”, black Biro drawing, 2009 by Jane Lee McCracken

Before I discovered Patrick Leigh Fermor, “A Time of Gifts”, Proust was the most beautiful writer I had read, he wrote art.  Patrick Leigh Fermor’s ethereal prose is so exquisite and rich I only ever managed two pages at each sitting in order to savour every phrase and image conjured. Patrick Leigh Fermor began his epic walk from Hook of Holland to Constantinople in 1933 when he was just 18 years old and chronicled his journey in “A Time of Gifts” and its sequel “Between the Woods and the Water”.  He feeds our thoughts of run away travel, of exotic Europa with its diverse landscapes, cultures and jewels of buildings and people, of halcyon times lost forever to war.  But above all it’s the sense of freedom he bestows as he roams across a blithe youth full of promise and adventure, capturing and bottling his journey as a gift for us of an inimitable perfume and through its fragrant notes he gives us back our own precious lost hours.

Patrick Leigh Fermor

Patrick Leigh Fermor

N.B. My husband bought me Artemis Cooper’s biography of Patrick Leigh Fermor and although I wanted to read it I delayed, waiting for news about “the last book”.  Leigh Fermor planned a third volume about the final part of his journey to Constantinople but suffering from writer’s block he was unable to finish it in his life time.  ‘The Broken Road From the Iron Gates to Mount Athos’ has been published post-humously bringing together two texts he left behind.  I hope Santa is good to me!  But there’s another reason I haven’t read his biography yet.  Patrick Leigh Fermor is the boy walking through pre-war Europe, the soldier and hero of WWII in “Ill Met By Moonlight”, W. Stanley Moss, and the intellectual who gave us “Mani” and “Roumeli”; he is legendary and maybe I’d rather he remains for me as the person he presents through his own beautiful words.

"A Time For Gifts", Patrick Leigh Fermor

“A Time of Gifts”, Patrick Leigh Fermor

For further information about ‘The Cupboard’ drawing please visit:  http://www.janeleemccracken.co.uk/photo_4657731.html

Luxury Archival Pigment Prints of ‘The Cupboard’ are available from:  http://www.janeleemccracken.co.uk/photo_11377802.html

Atka, King of New York!

'Atka', black Biro drawing, 2013 by Jane Lee McCracken

‘Atka’, black Biro drawing, 2013 by Jane Lee McCracken

Two days to go…..  The Wolf Conservation Center, NY, USA is having its annual WINE & WOLVES fundraiser on 12th December.  Since 1999 WCC has been teaching people about wolves and their role in the environment.   Have a look at the sterling work they do protecting wolves http://nywolf.org/ if you’re not familiar with WCC already.

This year I wanted to celebrate beautiful Atka, WCC’s magnificent Ambassador wolf, by making a portrait of him drawn in black Biro to donate to WCC’s fundraiser.  Atka has dedicated his life to educating people about protecting his wild brothers and sisters.  I imagined the rock Atka sits on as his favourite spot where he surveys the world around him and thought this is how I should draw him, King of New York State.

'Atka', detail of black Biro drawing, 2013

‘Atka’, detail of black Biro drawing, 2013

Wolves in America are having a bit of a hard time and need all the help they can get.  That’s why this drawing winged its way from Newcastle, England to New York State in time for 12th December’s WCC fundraiser.

Miss Lily is a big fan of Atka

Miss Lily is Atka’s biggest fan!

A big thank you to my mother and father for sponsoring the framing of the drawing so Atka is good to go and to Greg at http://www.mountkiscoframeshop.com/ for his excellent work framing the portrait in time and of course to Maggie Howell and Alex Spitzer at WCC for their tireless help organising the framing.

I hope Atka’s portrait finds a new home and in turn raises some funds for wee wolfie’s across America!

'Atka', signed and numbered luxury Archival Pigment Print

‘Atka’, signed and numbered luxury Archival Pigment Print

A note on prints – I am hoping to produce a luxury Archival Pigment Print run of ‘ATKA’ with 100% profit of any prints sold going to WCC if there is enough interest generated.  Please do get in touch if this is something you would be interested in or know anyone who would like a print – email jane@janeleemccracken.co.uk

To War…

'TV Screen III - "East Meets West, Forests Memories"', colour Biro drawing, 2010 by Jane Lee McCracken

‘TV Screen III – “East Meets West, Forests’ Memories”‘, colour Biro drawing, 2010 by Jane Lee McCracken

With nights drawing darker and the days colder and thoughts of when will it snow again ever present, reflections of winter and watching war films as a wee girl with my father, having just returned from a foreign land on business, are rekindled.  Whether it was the colours of epic explosions or the excitement of machine gun fire, war was a romantic notion and my father’s passion for war films passed to the next generation.

My beloved Grandmother on her wedding day to my Grandfather, 1st April 1939

My beloved Grandmother on her wedding day to my wonderful Grandfather, April 1939, Elie

My grandmother often talked about ‘The War’ unsurprisingly as WWII ended only 23 years before I was born and memories of rationing were still in their mere infancy at 14 years.  She mostly talked about how my Grandfather who died when I was four, was ‘never the same after The War’ – he was ground crew on Lancaster Bombers in Lincolnshire, badly injured when hit by the wing of a Lysander aircraft and I guess waited in vain for friends to return from bombing missions – how could he be the same, was anyone?

N.B. 10th December 2013 – “Two Years after retiring, my Dad died of kidney cancer.  He spent his last few moments, my mum at his side counting in the lancs from some hellish raid or other; F Fox, V Victor, B Baker and so on. I guess it troubled him whether a lanc was lost with all its crew…”  Extract about my Grandfather from my uncle’s newly published wonderful book ‘Wrapped in Rugby’, Douglas S. Bruce http://www.amazon.co.uk/Wrapped-Rugby-Douglas-Scott-Bruce/dp/1492154326

'Where Eagles Dare' quilt square detail from 'The Woodcutter's Quilt' made by Jane Lee McCracken for 'The Woodcutter's Cottage' Exhibition 2012 http://www.janeleemccracken.co.uk/photo_10019238.html

‘Where Eagles Dare’ quilt square detail from ‘The Woodcutter’s Quilt’ made by Jane Lee McCracken for ‘The Woodcutter’s Cottage’ Exhibition 2012 http://www.janeleemccracken.co.uk/photo_10019238.html

'The Woodcutter's Cottage' Exhibition at the Mercer Art Gallery, 2013. Installation includes 'The Woodcutter's Quilt', 'Woodcutter's Giant Pillow', 'British Moth Throw', my Grandmother's Scottish Queen size bed and dressing table circa 1950, British Moth prints entomology case in drawer of dressing table and 'Red Riding Hood's Cloak' suspended.

‘The Woodcutter’s Cottage’ Exhibition at the Mercer Art Gallery, 2013. Installation includes ‘The Woodcutter’s Quilt’, ‘Woodcutter’s Giant Pillow’, ‘British Moth Throw’, my Grandmother’s Scottish Queen size bed and dressing table circa 1950, British Moth prints entomology case in drawer of dressing table and ‘Red Riding Hood’s Cloak’ suspended.

To this day ‘Where Eagles Dare’, MGM, 1968 remains one of my favourite films.  The wind howling round the Bavarian Alps, the beautiful glare and hardship of the inexorably falling snow, hues of blue from azure to midnight, brilliant orange explosions, brilliant Richard Burton; cool Clint Eastwood a ‘second rate punk’, the fairy tale ‘Schloss Adler’ with its warren of hallways and monumental fireplace, a secret aspiration to be Mary Ure’s MI6 agent ‘Mary Ellison’ and that cable car!  From beginning to end with its dramatic score and the faint rat-a-tat drum beat crescendo in the opening seconds it is still one of the most exciting and gripping films I have seen.  (My family recently discovered a forgotten memory that my father had once shared a lift in the Inter-Continental Hotel, Budapest, with Richard Burton and Elizabeth Taylor in the 1970s not long after ‘Where Eagles Dare’ was made – in our excitement that such movie royalty had briefly entered life’s theatre we foolishly asked “was she really beautiful?” and in his concise, ‘Meldrew-esque’ way he replied “yes” and swiftly moved on to mention how charming they both were while sharing a lift conversation with him – through his simple affirmation we knew she was truly beautiful!)

Richard Burton and Elizabeth Taylor during the filming of 'Where Eagles Dare', 1968

Richard Burton and Elizabeth Taylor during the filming of ‘Where Eagles Dare’, 1968

As I grew older the romantic excitement of war increasingly paled and was replaced by horror after spending many years viewing the reality of war through documentaries.  What most prevails is the individual suffering of so many caught up in the decisions and actions of so few.  Over 60 million dead during WWII, the holocaust, the painful displacement of people and their loss of everything they once knew, the horror that their eyes transmitted, not to mention the incalculable loss of wildlife, livestock and pets, in many of our present cosy bubbles how can we truly understand what war and such loss is like?  We can’t.

'Russian Man, "Ivan's Childhood", Andrei Tarkovsky, 1957', detail of quilt square from 'The Woodcutter's Quilt', 2012

‘Russian Man, “Ivan’s Childhood”, Andrei Tarkovsky, 1957’, detail of quilt square from ‘The Woodcutter’s Quilt’, 2012

'The Sideboard II' red Biro drawing, 2008 by Jane Lee McCracken, inspired by the girl in the red coat, 'Schindler's List', 1993, Steven Spielberg http://www.janeleemccracken.co.uk/photo_4657718.html

‘The Sideboard II’ red Biro drawing, 2008 by Jane Lee McCracken, inspired by the girl in the red coat, ‘Schindler’s List’, 1993, Steven Spielberg http://www.janeleemccracken.co.uk/photo_4657718.html

'Sindy and the Troika', black Biro drawing , 2008, by Jane Lee McCracken symbolises possessions left behind when people flee their homes during war or disaster.

‘Sindy and the Troika’, black Biro drawing , 2008, by Jane Lee McCracken symbolises possessions left behind when people flee their homes during war or disaster.

I began to try representing individual suffering through my work and create memorials to lives lived and ways of life lost, both human and animal not just through war but disasters, environmental destruction, to empathise with reality and not the Siberia of statistics.   Some years ago I had watched an English soldier relating a particular experience in a WWII documentary.  Towards the end of the war, in battle he had shot a German soldier dead on a road.  When he went over to check the body, he saw it was just a young boy and placed in the buttonhole of the boy’s uniform was Edelweiss still blooming.  Edelweiss does not last more than a couple of hours when picked fresh off the mountains so he knew that the boy had come down from his mountain home that morning to war.  Tears of futility fell down the old man’s cheeks.

'TV Screen III - "East Meets West, Forests Memories"', detail, colour Biros, 2010

‘TV Screen III – “East Meets West, Forests Memories”‘, detail, colour Biros, 2010

This memory was the catalyst for creating ‘TV screen III – East Meets West, Forests’ Memories’, that and a passion for forests.  Drawn in colour Biro, this piece took five months to produce and was inspired from stills of films such as ‘Band of Brothers’, 2001, HBO,  ‘The Red and the White’, 1967, Miklós Jancsó, ‘Come and See’, 1985, Elem Klimov and of course Lily in a starring role as the white wolf or the faithful dog.  This drawing was made to symbolise and consider that both good and bad people exist within all sides of a conflict and to imagine the conflicts as well as the facets of ‘life’ witnessed by mighty forests across Europe.  It ultimately represents how nature fights back and survives no matter what human destruction is plied on it and in the end how futile war is and how little we learn from our mistakes.  Viva nature!

For more information on this piece and its symbolism please visit my website via this link:

http://www.janeleemccracken.co.uk/photo_5698743.html

Luxury Archival Pigment Prints of this piece crafted by prestigious photographer and print-maker http://mrjacklowe.com/ are available to buy from my website via this link:

http://www.janeleemccracken.co.uk/photo_7578872.html

Lily White

'"Sweet". Wolves. In Homage to the Last Great Carnivores of Eurasia', 2013. original black Biro drawing

‘”Sweet”, Wolves, In Homage to the Last Great Carnivores of Eurasia’, 2013, original black Biro drawing by Jane Lee McCracken

Post genesis I wanted a white dog.  Well here she is above, the beautiful, wonder dog, Lily.

Yearnings for a white dog were borne from my early addiction to watching television, specifically foreign import programmes such as the hauntingly scored ‘Belle and Sebastian’, France, 1965 and the visually beautiful ‘White Horses’, Hanns Wiedmann, 1965, Germany/Yugoslavia.   Tintin’s Snowy was a particular inspiration.

Aged two being given my beloved Dirk as a birthday present, a Labrador puppy named after one of my mother’s favourite film stars surname Bogart, presented me with a problem, Dirk was black.  But circumstances did not deter and I seized the chance to create my first white dog in a ‘Frankenstein-ial’ effort several months after my birthday.  The beautiful, black puppy and I were in the kitchen of the family homestead in Scotland with my father who was glossing the doors – white.  The doorbell rang and my father clearly not blessed with powers of the second sight left us unattended with a huge tin of gloss paint and a paintbrush.

I distinctly remember Dirk allowing me to paint him while he lay in his wicker basket, he was the most gentle of dogs.  Thoughts of those white dogs I loved Belle and Snowy, sailed through my mind like white furry clouds at each stroke of my goal.  I remember chirping to Dirk as painting commenced although I have no idea what words of reassurance passed between us to put him at ease.  Having managed to get a good way through blanching Dirk before the conversation at the front door ended, my father finally discovered the white metamorphoses that had been created in his absence.  Tears of horror dissolved into the dismay of ‘what am I going to do?’! What he did – he took turpentine and covered Dirk in it. Naturally the turpentine inflicted some pain.

Dirk took control of the situation, ran into the garden and rolled in the earth.  This stripped the paint from his coat and soothed the irritation of turpentine on his skin.  It took a full year of supplementing his diet with olive oil to rejuvenate his black coat and till the day he died, traces of white paint remained on his basket.  I miss him.

Dirk exacted his revenge for the turpentine bath several weeks later when he frenziedly tried to dig through the kitchen wall removing all the newly pasted orange wallpaper in a ‘left on my own protest’.

Several things were cultivated in those first couple of years, my deep love for animals with their consummate loyalty, honest instinct and heart wrenching innocence and my love of films and musings of travel, all entities that I use today in my work.

N.B.  My husband didn’t deliberately choose Lily as a birthday gift for me (old habits die hard) because she was white.  On the contrary she was born with a dark grey mask but Northern Inuit masks can fade and rather like a cygnet to a swan Lily’s grey mask faded and disappeared to leave her face almost white apart from the palest gold ears that reveal themselves in the winter.

'Lily', 2008, original black Biro drawing of Lily aged 14 weeks by Jane Lee McCracken

‘Lily’, 2008, original black Biro drawing of Lily aged 14 weeks by Jane Lee McCracken

Crafted by master photographer and printmaker http://mrjacklowe.com/ – luxurious Archival Pigment Prints of ‘Sweet’ are available to buy from my online shop.:

http://www.janeleemccracken.co.uk/photo_11766659.html

"'Sweet', Wolves, In Homage to the Last Great Carnivores of Eurasia", 2013, Archival Pigment Print from original black Biro drawing

Archival Pigment Print from original Biro drawing of “‘Sweet’, Wolves, In Homage to the Last Great Carnivores of Eurasia”, 2013, 44cm x 44cm

Limited Edition china plates will be available soon.

'"Sweet", Wolves, In Homage to the Last Great Carnivores of Eurasia' Limited Edition China Plate Series, 2013

‘”Sweet”, Wolves, In Homage to the Last Great Carnivores of Eurasia’ Limited Edition China Plate Series, 2013