New A0 Prints at Whosit & Whatsit

A0 prints PR 300

P1640483A0 Limited Edition Archival Pigment Prints

November sees the launch of my new A0 image limited edition print series at prestigious home to independent cutting edge design Whosit & Whatsit, Newcastle upon Tyne. These unique large format archival pigment prints are of the finest quality, expertly crafted on 380g Hahnemuhle German Etching.  Each Biro drawing takes weeks and months to create and incorporates a multi-layered drawing technique. Extremely high resolution scans of the original Biro drawings capture every pen stroke, enhanced through these statement prints that allow the viewer to virtually step into the drawings. There are only 10 prints of each of the following drawings available, priced at £895 per print:

A0 prints PR 30 - Version 2

A0 prints PR 30 - Version 3

A0 prints PR 30 - Version 4

 

Fine English China Art Plates and Limited Edition 50 x 50cm Archival Pigment Prints

Also available to order from Whosit & Whatsit is my fine English china art plate series ‘In Homage to the Last Great Carnivores of Eurasia’, made in Stoke on Trent by celebrated ceramic manufacturer The New English. Limited edition 50 x 50cm signed and numbered archival pigment prints of original Biro drawings for each plate design priced £140 per print are also displayed and stocked at W&W.

A0 prints PR 40 - Version 2

Top Row Left to Right: Sweet, Revenge, Our Forefathers, Our Loss. Bottom Row Left to Right: Shh, it’s a Tiger!, Bang!, Mummy Bear and Baby Bear, The Orphans.

Plates measure 28cm diameter. Limited editions: 200 per design. Order price: £150 per plate.

A0 prints PR 40 - Version 3

An A0 Artist’s proof of ‘Butterfly Lover’ is now on display in Whosit & Whatsit’s beautiful second floor Brew Bar. Pop in for a brew and a browse through the magnificent design items in this unique store housed in a stunning Grade II listed building on Newcastle’s historic quayside.

P1640467 - Version 2

All afore mentioned products are available to buy or order in store or online at:

www.whositandwhatsit.com

46 Sandhill

Newcastle upon Tyne

NE1 3JF

 

T: 0191 5800 242

E: hello@whositandwhatsit.com

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Opening Hours

Monday                       10am – 8pm

Tuesday                       Closed

Wednesday                  10am – 8pm

Thursday                      10am – 8pm

Friday                          10am – 6pm

Saturday                      10am – 6pm

Sunday                        10am – 4pm

 

December Opening Hours:  

Monday – Thursday 10am – 8pm, Friday – Sunday 10am – 6pm

 

McCracken_Bear_R.tif

 

E: jane@janeleemcracken.co.uk

 

 

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Lakshmi … Work in Progress on Tiger Sculpture Tattoo

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‘Lakshmi’ blue Biro drawing on Tiger Sculpture, Jane Lee McCracken

Lakshmi, Goddess of wealth and prosperity, Vishnu’s wife, embodiment of beauty… this week’s work in progress on ‘Blue Tiger’ Sculpture Tattoo.

Side view of Lakshmi drawing  depicting how her shoulder and arm follow the curves of the tiger sculpture's right shoulder

Side view of Lakshmi drawing depicting how her shoulder and arm follow the curves of the tiger sculpture’s right shoulder

This blue Biro drawing is inspired by a vintage painting of Lakshmi and an image of a beautiful Italian film star!

Detail Lakshmi's face

Detail Lakshmi’s face

Lakshmi’s curves are enhanced by drawing her body over the muscular shoulder of the tiger.Her head is positioned at 90 degrees to Vishnu’s head drawn on the tiger’s back.

Vishnu and Lakshmi blue Biro tattoos on Tiger Sculpture

Vishnu and Lakshmi blue Biro tattoos on Tiger Sculpture

Symbolism plays a large part in the work I make forming an intricate web of analogies. Using objects as I find them for making art is also an important part of the process; imperfections tell their own story and if you look closely there are scratches on the surface of the sculpture that have been deliberately retained.

'King of India' blue Biro drawing part of Tiger Sculpture Tattoo

‘King of India’ blue Biro drawing part of Tiger Sculpture Tattoo

Last weeks tattoo drawing ‘King of India’ was drawn over the tiger sculpture’s back leg.  Vishnu’s hand is layered through the Bengal tiger’s face.

This work in progress highlights the familiarity of tigers iconic beauty and their symbolic importance to humanity.

‘Weeping Durga’, Tiger Inspired Art

'Weeping Durga', 2015 colour Biro Drawing

‘Weeping Durga’, 2015 colour Biro Drawing, Jane Lee McCracken

‘Weeping Durga’ Icon, inspired by Hindu iconography celebrates the beauty and majesty of the Bengal Tiger and represents Durga the Tiger Goddess weeping for her tigers threatened with extinction.  It is the companion icon for ‘Blue Tiger’ Tattooed Sculpture (work in progress).  ‘Blue Tiger’ sculpture stylised and painted white to reflect ancient art and drawn over in blue Biro, looks towards ‘Weeping Durga’ for hope she will protect him.  But Durga now looks for the compassion of humans to save tigers from extinction.

'Blue Tiger' Tattooed Sculpture, work in progress

‘Blue Tiger’ Tattooed Sculpture, work in progress

‘Weeping Durga’ encapsulates the vibrant colours of Indian culture and Hinduism.  It layers drawn images of Bengal Tigers over a drawing of a traditional Hindu icon painting set around a jewel like representation of Durga, which incorporates layered drawn images of two iconic Bollywood Actors, Rekha and Shabana Azami.  As with most of my pieces symbolising  threat of extinction to a particular species, there are unfinished areas of the drawing representing ‘disappearance’.

Detail of Bengal Tiger and Durga, colour Biro drawing

Detail of Bengal Tiger and Durga, colour Biro drawing

The drawing took 3 months to make with around half a square inch completed per day.  Only 8 colour Biro pens were used with the colours mixed on top of one another within the drawing to achieve the finished palette.

Detail of Bengal Tiger, colour Biro drawing

Detail of Bengal Tiger, colour Biro drawing

 

‘Weeping Durga’ has been donated to Save Wild Tigers for their upcoming event ‘Be Inspired’ at the Savoy, London 9th October 2015.  Splendid tiger inspired artwork courtesy of 18 artists to be auctioned in benefit for Save Wild Tigers is now being previewed on Paddle8 with bidding opening on 22nd September – 8th October.

For further information about Save Wild Tigers Savoy Gala Event on 9th October please contact:

Indy@savewildtigers.org

 

Tiger Sculpture Tattoo coming on!

Tiger Sculpture Tattoo drawing in blue Biro

Tiger Sculpture Tattoo drawing in blue Biro

Rarrrrrr! Voila, le tigre!

Blue Biro tattoo drawing on my tiger sculpture is coming on.  As mentioned in my previous post Tiger Sculpture Tattoo…Work in Progress, this is the hardest surface I have drawn on to date as the clay sculpture has been painted to replicate ancient sculptures and icons. Therefore the surface is not smooth and more difficult to achieve fine detail.

Detail of sculpture tattoo blue Biro drawing on curved back of tiger figurine

Detail of sculpture tattoo blue Biro drawing on curved back of tiger figurine

The layers of images are starting to appear within the blue Biro drawing.  Over the body of the Hindu god a roaring tiger’s face is emerging like a graphic t-shirt!

Back of tiger sculpture with blue Biro tattoo drawing.

Back of tiger sculpture with blue Biro tattoo drawing.

This piece celebrates the beauty of tigers, one of the most iconic animals on earth, their survival for over 1.8 million years longer than humans who’s existence is relatively short in comparison and our cultural heritage of representing tigers through art.

Much to do!

Tiger Sculpture Tattoo – Work in Progress …

Tiger Sculpture painted white, prepared for drawing on

Tiger Sculpture painted white, prepared for drawing on

First sneak peak of blue Biro tattoo drawing in progress on my tiger sculpture … it’s the hardest surface I’ve drawn on to date!

I sculpted the tiger figurine using air-drying clay and it stands one and half feet in height. Inspired by ancient statues and icons, representationally its form echoes ancient and prehistoric art and our need to express the world around us, a world tigers have existed in for over 1.8 million years longer than humans. The sculpture also symbolises the beauty and cultural significance of humanity’s ancient art heritage, which often depicted imagery of wildlife.

Side view of tiger sculpture with beginnings of blue Biro tattoo drawing

Side view of tiger sculpture with beginnings of blue Biro tattoo drawing

In preparation for the blue Biro tattoo and in order to replicate ancient statues I painted the tiger sculpture white rather than give it a contemporary finish. However painting the sculpture creates a textured surface of tiny brush marks, leaving it extremely hard to draw on.  But equally the Biro settles over the brush mark grains and forms spontaneous patterns within the drawing

When drawing in Biro your brain adjusts to predicting when the Biro is likely to blot. I use a blotting sheet to remove ink-blots periodically from the nib before continuing drawing. The predictive response working on this surface is lessened as Biro blots more indiscriminately on an uneven surface.

Detail of blue Biro tattoo drawing in progress

Detail of blue Biro tattoo drawing in progress

With humanity’s cultural heritage in mind the face of the Hindu deity in the tattoo design is significantly layered with a traditional Hindu icon painting and an image of a human face, yet to be revealed! The culminating face celebrates our multi-cultural world and our natural and artistic legacy. The use of an illustrated face layered with a photograph of a real human face retains an animated quality seen in iconography combined with realism.

Note the optical illusion within the face where the layering of the two faces create a sense of movement around the eyes and mouth area.

Overall view of tiger sculpture back and beginnings of tattoo drawing

Overall view of tiger sculpture back and beginnings of tattoo drawing

This piece has been made in solidarity against the destruction of wildlife and ancient art.

Much work to do! Watch this space for further updates on progress and the subject matter behind the drawing.

 

War Horse – Remembering all Beings lost in The Great War

'Odyssey', The Dreamers, 2013 original Biro drawing on china by Jane Lee McCracken

‘Odyssey’, The Dreamers, 2013 original Biro drawing on china by Jane Lee McCracken

‘Odyssey’ (Lomonosov Foal) – A lying foal ‘Odyssey’ dreams of his odyssey through life – black Biro drawing made of layers of images inspired from ‘The Red and the White’, Miklós Jancsó, 1967, ‘White Mane’, Albert Lamorisse, 1953 and ‘Les sang des bêtes’, Georges Franju, 1949.  Hope for a bright future is portrayed in the innocent form of the young foal’s figurine as Odyssey faces his journey through life, tracing his playful youth as a colt ridden bareback by a young boy to cavalry horse of the revolutionary Red Army, to its journeys end at an abattoir.  This piece depicts the fate of many war-horses, often cruelly treated and asks whether this is a fitting demise for an animal who has given its life to war service for humans?

'Odyssey', The Dreamers, 2013 original Biro drawing on china by Jane Lee McCracken

‘Odyssey’, The Dreamers, 2013 original Biro drawing on china by Jane Lee McCracken

For further information on this piece please visit this earlier post ‘Meet Odyssey and Old Foe’

 

NEW WORK Coming Soon – Meet ‘Chernobyl Cat’

'Chernobyl Cat', biro on china figurine, 2013 by Jane Lee McCracken

‘Chernobyl Cat’, Biro on china figurine, 2013 by Jane Lee McCracken

New work is on its way!  Made late last year prototype ‘Chernobyl Cat’,  one of seven figurines, ‘The Dreamers’, original Biro drawings on china forms part of a wider project about life and death in the animal world, both naturally and at the hands of man.

A feral cat at play in an abandoned house within the exclusion zone around the Chernobyl reactor dreams of birth mutations due to radiation.  The black biro drawing is made of layers from still images of ‘Chernobyl: Life in the Dead Zone’, Discovery Channel, 2007.  Nature in the exclusion zone of Chernobyl seems to be thriving with human interference now removed but scientist are polarised as to the fate of animals living in this area and their long-term survival from the catastrophic levels of radiation that still exist.  This is represented by a pattern of mutated cats and dolls as well as the cat’s natural predators, wolves and foxes – the conglomerated pattern suggests folk art patterns of Russia.

'Chernobyl Cat',Biro drawing on china, 2013 by Jane Lee McCracken

‘Chernobyl Cat’, Biro drawing on china, 2013 by Jane Lee McCracken

Inspired by Goya’s Los Caprichos, ‘The Dreamers’ represent the innocent physicality of sleep whilst the torrid kaleidoscope of dreams cascades through the brain.   ‘The Dreamers’ also represents the quiet moments of peace and daydreams before the inevitability of life’s realities steals ‘innocence’.  Dreams play out like films in our minds, abstract fragments of the brain’s data input of information and our fears and hopes.  Much of my work is based on the subject matter of loss through war and disaster or environmental destruction, represented in layered Biro drawings using stills from films often creating an abstracted phantasmagoria of images and thoughts.  Films transport and capture our minds just like dreams do; they face our fears, portray our hopes and can be therapeutic tools in our waking hours as dreams are deemed brain therapy in our sleep.

'Chernobyl Cat', biro drawing on china, 2013 by Jane Lee McCracken

‘Chernobyl Cat’, Biro drawing on china, 2013 by Jane Lee McCracken

I made a random collection of figurines from local charity shops, so that my philosophy of simply using what is close at hand, such as a Biro for drawings was upheld with the choice of figurines available on each day.  Damaged and repaired figurines were still selected to retain the memory of the figurine’s previous life and owner.  Each figurine was then painted white, purifying them from the original manufacturers painted design and stripping each figurine back to the foundations of its physical representation thus creating a blank canvas.  This brings a sense of life to each figurine without the distraction of painted design before the original black Biro drawings are drawn onto the painted surface as well as white representing the purity of ‘a being’ at sleep.  An incredibly hard surface to draw on, these pieces were challenging and remain precious for the intimacy shared with each piece by holding them in my hands as I drew on them.

Further images will be released as this project continues.