‘Red Wolf’ Limited Edition Prints for Critically Endangered Wolves

'Red Wolf' 2016 original red Biro drawing by Jane Lee McCracken for the Wolf Conservation Center

‘Red Wolf’ 2016 original red Biro drawing by Jane Lee McCracken for the Wolf Conservation Center

Beautiful, adaptable and rare, the elusive Red wolf was once common to the eastern United States where it roamed for thousands of years. Now, critically endangered the wild population of just 45 individuals inhabits northeastern North Carolina, while a captive breeding program includes 200 wolves. Jane’s red Biro (ballpoint pen) drawing entitled ‘Red Wolf’ made for the Wolf Conservation Center, New York captures the beauty and fragility of this enigmatic creature whose wide-ranging habitat once included swampland.

Member of the Wolf Conservation Center's Red Wolf Pack. Photo Credit: Maggie Howell WCC 2016

Member of the Wolf Conservation Center’s Red Wolf Pack. Photo Credit: Maggie Howell WCC 2016

With kind permission of WCC Jane used images of their Red wolf pack as inspiration for her drawing. She asked Executive Director Maggie Howell and Curator Rebecca Bose what their own personal favourite qualities of the Red wolf were, and they both agreed “a strong sense of family”. Therefore ‘Red Wolf’ celebrates the three stages of a wolf’s life from pup to juvenile through to adulthood. While an adult Red Wolf treads quietly across a page of history, through a forest of Cypress trees covered in Spanish moss like lacework through its fur, its young pup waits in the den. A Whitetail fawn drinking from a forest pool suggests the tranquillity of nature. Sibling juvenile Red wolves tentatively emerge from the forest, inquisitively exploring the world around them while the adult watches over them.

A limited edition of 50 signed and numbered ‘Red Wolf’ prints is now available from Jane’s SHOP.  Each print sold benefits WCC’s vital work ensuring the survival of Red wolves.

For further information about the Wolf Conservation Center visit www.nywolf.org

Detail of 'Red Wolf' red Biro drawing, Jane Lee McCracken

Detail of ‘Red Wolf’ red Biro drawing, Jane Lee McCracken

 

NEW – Greetings Cards

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New greetings card range by Jane Lee McCracken – four designs depicting original Biro drawings.

This spring sees the launch of Jane’s new greetings card range featuring a selection of her most iconic Biro drawings to date.  Printed in the UK, these high quality 15 x 21cm cards capture the intricate detail of each poignant drawing.

 

Greetings Cards Photos

Greetings cards range depicting ‘Russian Doll’, ‘The Sideboards II’, ‘Sweet’ and ‘Our Forefathers’.

In stock at Newcastle-upon-Tyne’s premier design store Whosit & Whatsit, Jane’s cards are now available to purchase from her online shop.

Sets of 4 cards are individually wrapped with envelopes and priced at £10 including postage and packaging per set.

 

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To purchase cards sets please visit www.janeleemccracken/shop

 

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‘The Sideboard II’ Greetings Card

 

For further details please contact jane@janeleemccracken.co.uk

 

Logo Sweet sticker 4 - Version 2

 

‘Wild and Endangered’ Drawing Competition Launched!

Print design of Years 5 & 6 endangered species Biro drawings

Print design of Years 5 & 6 endangered species Biro drawings 2014, inspiration for competition poster design

Judging of ‘Wild and Endangered’ my new drawing competition for school students commenced today!  And what a day!  Piloted at a local primary school in North East England, the competition focuses on developing students drawing skills, whilst learning about endangered species.  The first competition has seen an overwhelming response with nearly every student participating.  The standard of artwork is extremely high with ardor and creative expression evident in each entry, Judging is proving tremendously uplifting and challenging in equal measure!

The competition is simple, “create an A4 drawing made with a drawing medium of your choice, of an endangered species of your choice”.  Entry fee is £1 per entrant.  Profit after prizes goes directly to eminent international wildlife charity the Born Free Foundation and a charity of the school’s choice.  The competition seeks to further encourage children’s natural passion for drawing and animals and was inspired by ‘Drawing for Endangered Species’ workshops.  Donating my time to judge the competition and design a poster from winning and runner’s up entries is an uniquely rewarding experience.

The poster design of students artwork will be presented to the school as an opportunity to raise funds through poster sales.

Competition prizes include:

First Prize:  Signed and numbered framed print of ‘Sweet’.

First Prize signed print of ''Sweet', by Jane Lee McCracken

”Sweet’, by Jane Lee McCracken

Second prize:  Signed and numbered framed print of ‘Malaysian Forest’:

Second Prize signed print of 'Malaysian Forest' by Jane Lee McCracken

‘Malaysian Forest’ by Jane Lee McCracken

Third prize: Signed and numbered framed print of ‘Orangutans’

Third Prize, signed and numbered print of 'Orangutans' by Jane Lee McCracken

‘Orangutans’ by Jane Lee McCracken

Winners and runner’s up will receive a copy of the poster design that includes their artwork. Winners will be announced during the summer term.

A huge thank you to the staff and students of this local school for their hard work and enthusiasm participating in the first competition.

‘Wild and Endangered’ is a project I hope to bring to other schools.  For further information please contact:

jane@janeleemccracken.co.uk

 

 

‘Coyote’ – For the Song Dogs of North America

‘Coyote’, 2015 black Biro drawing by Jane Lee McCracken

On 23rd May 2015 at Niagara on the Lake, Coyote Watch Canada will be holding ‘A Song Dog Celebration’, their first fundraising Gala event.  Coyote’s are known as ‘Song Dogs’ for their haunting vocal artistry and are one of the most adaptable and charming animals on the planet.

“Coyote” which was made exclusively for CWC’s ‘A Song Dog Celebration’ reflects on the harmony that once existed between coyotes and man, the destruction of that relationship, and the hope for a return to understanding and co-existence.

At the left of the piece are three images of coyotes. Coyotes form tight family bonds, one of the traits they share with humans. Like coyotes, First Nations people and Native Americans have suffered at the hands of ignorance and greed. While celebrating the harmony between native peoples and coyotes, “Coyote” also memorializes the loss experienced by both.

Reigning over the drawing is an image of Mother Nature as a native princess. The background is derived from Edward S. Curtis’s beautiful portrait of Hattie Tom, Chiricahua Apache (1899). Overlaid is an image of Audrey Hepburn’s face. Hepburn played Rachel Zachery in John Huston’s The Unforgiven (1960). The film, while flawed, attempted to explore the issue of racism towards Native Americans.

At the heart of the drawing is a coyote’s face layered through an image of the Rocky Mountains, suggesting the majesty of nature. A fifth coyote flashes through the piece, running towards the future. In Native American mythology, the coyote was seen as the Creator and sometimes took the form of man. Thus, layered through the coyote’s body is a representation of a native man, symbolizing the morphing of man and coyote into one being, forever entwined through mythology and history.

Finally, migrating monarch butterflies are projected on the coyote’s fur, representing hope and joy. They symbolize celebration of the work of Coyote Watch Canada in its quest for compassionate co-existence with coyotes and other wildlife.

This piece is for North America’s Song Dogs.

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‘Coyote’ original drawing will be auctioned at ‘A Song Dog Celebration’

 A Limited edition run of 50 A3 signed and numbered prints of ‘Coyote’ are available now with all profits going directly to Coyote Watch Canada:

www.janeleemccracken.co.uk/shop/conservation art prints

A special thank you to wildlife advocate David Shellenberger for his kind introduction to CWC and for his help and advice towards ‘Coyote’.

Christmas Presents from Malaysia!

Porcupine Family Camera Trap Image. Credit: WCS-Malaysia Program

‘Porcupine Family’ Camera Trap Image. Photo Credit: WCS-Malaysia Program

Being privileged to work on an up and coming project for WCS-Malaysia Program has also brought about receipt of touching gifts – camera trap images all the way from the beautiful Malaysian jungle, capturing the unique and extraordinary wildlife of the Malay Peninsula. The stellar team at WCS-Malaysia Program, part of global conservation organisation the Wildlife Conservation Society, are working tirelessly to secure the future of Malaysian flora and fauna.  “A picture is worth a thousand words” and the following heartening images bring a message of joy and hope this Christmas, of thriving youngsters and WCS-Malaysia Program’s successes in the field.  Thank you to Melvin Gumal Ph.D., Director of WCS-Malaysia Program for these inspirational images.  For more information about their exceptional work visit www.wcsmalaysia.org.  Enjoy!

'Asian Elephants, Mother and Calf' Camera Trap Image.  Photo Credit: WCS-Malaysia Program

‘Asian Elephants, Mother and Calf’ Camera Trap Image. Photo Credit: WCS-Malaysia Program

 

'Mother and Young Gibbon' Photo Credit:  WCS -Malaysia Program

‘Mother and Young Gibbon’ Photo Credit: WCS -Malaysia Program

 

'Young Organutans' Photo Credit: WCS-Malaysia Project

‘Young Organutans’ Photo Credit: WCS-Malaysia Project

 

'Bearded Pig and Young' Camera Trap Image.  Photo Credit: WCS-Malaysia Program

‘Bearded Pig and Young’ Camera Trap Image. Photo Credit: WCS-Malaysia Program

 

'Malayan Tapir and Calf' Camera Trap Image.  Photo Credit: WCS-Malaysia Program

‘Malayan Tapir and Calf’ Camera Trap Image. Photo Credit: WCS-Malaysia Program

 

'Trio of Pheasants',

‘Trio of Pheasants’, Camera Trap Image.  Photo Credit: WCS-Malaysia Program

 

'Sambar Deer and Fawn' Camera Trap Image.  Photo Credit: WCS-Malaysia Program

‘Sambar Deer and Fawn’ Camera Trap Image. Photo Credit: WCS-Malaysia Program

A very Merry Christmas and Best Wishes for 2015!

Slàinte Mhath!

‘Rhino 2014’

'Rhino 2014', In Homage to 'Africa', black Biro drawing by Jane Lee McCracken

‘Rhino 2014’, In Homage to ‘Africa’, black Biro drawing by Jane Lee McCracken

Revealed, ‘Rhino 2014’, for Mark Thorpe of Sea Wild Earth and Chengeta Wildlife!  An artwork dedicated to threatened wildlife across the globe.

“Inspired by Albrecht Dürer’s iconic drawing Rhinoceros’,1515 , ‘Rhino 2014’ by artist Jane Lee McCracken symbolises man’s curiosity and relationship with the natural world, from Dürer’s epochal representation, to the state of our environment to date. Within 500 years of Dürer’s creative legacy, rhinoceros species teeter on the brink of extinction alongside tigers, pangolin, sharks and other keystone species. Lions, elephants and manta ray have also reached threatened status. Where once rhinoceros roamed in vast numbers, treading a 50 million year old evolutionary path, from the 1600s onwards, rhino numbers have plummeted by 90%. Hunting, habitat loss and poaching for their horns to use in traditional Chinese medicine, factor amongst the reasons for their more recent and rapid decline. From a 16th century artist who executed man’s inquisitive propensity to study species never seen before in the west, Jane’s drawing underlines our vast 21st century intellect of wildlife and the threats that face life on earth. Ultimately this piece accentuates the cynosural qualities of the depicted species and the spirit of Emmy Award winning underwater cameraman, Mark Thorpe’s enlightening quote, “extinction in an age of awareness is simply inexcusable”.

Paying homage to the BBC documentary series ‘Africa’, 2013, Jane uses this as the pivotal inspiration for her Biro drawing as the majority of species represented in this artwork are from the African continent. A monumental wildlife series, presented by David Attenborough ‘Africa’ reveals the breathtaking beauty and fragility of Africa and the species inhabiting its lands. Jane photographed 1000’s of images of ‘Africa’ as it played onscreen to give a sense of cinematic transience to her drawing. There is also an evanescent quality to the piece, symbolising that species are disappearing at a rate beyond that of their natural cycle. By portraying specific animals that feature in ‘Africa’, she presents the individualism of each animal, both aesthetically and characteristically; thus emphasising the fact that each animal is unique and precious to the survival of its species. Selecting some of the most poignant scenes from the documentary, including perhaps the most touching of all, the death from drought enforced starvation of an elephant calf and the “little chat” between David Attenborough and a blind rhino calf, Jane confronts the threats these species face both naturally and at the hands of man.”

“Like it or not this generation is responsible for handing on the world’s wildlife to the next. No one knows what the future holds for this little creature [blind rhino calf], nor indeed what changes will take place on the great continent in which he lives … but one thing is certain, what happens here is more important than it has ever been and that the relationship of the rest of the world to this great continent and the creatures that live in it is more important than ever before. On whichever part of the planet we live we all have a part to play in what sort of future this wild continent has.” David Attenborough, ‘Africa’ epilogue.   

'Rhinoceros', Albrecht Durer, 15

‘Rhinoceros’, Albrecht Durer, 1515

Drawing Layers

'Rhino 2014', detail of elephants

‘Rhino 2014’, detail of elephants

Elephant Calf (Rhino back) – depicting one of the most moving sequences from ‘Africa’ this detail portrays the moment a starving elephant calf, too weak to hold up its head, collapses into the drought-ridden grass. This drawing symbolises that elephants endure natural adversities as well as poaching for their tusks.

Mother Elephant – layered above the dying calf is a drawing of its mother weeping over the death of her calf. Having stood vigil and tried to revive the calf, she accepts its death. Elephants are the only known species apart from humans to practice ritual behaviour when confronting death, including grief and have been known to show the same emotions when encountering human death.

Dead Elephant Calf and Mother Elephant – a tiny drawing through the centre of the piece shows the body of the dead calf lying in the dust and the moment the mother elephant senses she has to leave her calf and return to the herd.  Left behind to tend to her sick calf, the herd has continued its quest to find water and avoid further death.  As she turns and walks away on her journey a faded image of another adult elephant beyond her indicates that she eventually returns to the herd.

Adult Elephant – layered through the dying calf is an image of a triumphant adult elephant drinking from a water hole, celebrating the monumental greatness of the largest land mammal on earth, surrounded by the slight stature of gazelle and zebra.

 

'Rhino 2014', Starlit Rhino detail

‘Rhino 2014’, Starlit Rhino detail

Starlit Rhino – the main face and body of ‘Rhino 2014’ is inspired from a sequence in ‘Africa’ capturing newly uncovered rhino behaviour. Deemed unsociable, film evidence reveals that rhinos actually gather to socialise at a secret watering hole under the stars.

Blind Rhino Calf (drawing on main Rhino face) – one of the stars of ‘Africa’, a blind rhino calf’s every move is guided by rangers.   This drawing symbolises that each individual animal including this calf is precious and holds a key to the future security of its species.

Prehistoric Rhino Etching (drawing on main Rhino face) – prehistoric rock engraving of a rhino found in the Sahara becomes a layered drawing as if tattooed on the rhino’s skin and plays as a reminder as to how long rhinos have existed on earth.

'Rhino 2014', lions detail

‘Rhino 2014’, lions detail

Young Lion – portrait of a noble young lion suggests the majesty of ‘the king of the jungle’, but its eyes betray a reflective demeanour expressing that hunting and habitat loss have seen wild lion numbers plummet from 200,000 a century ago to fewer than 30, 000. The lion gazes up towards an uncertain future.

Lion Cub (under main lion) – portrait of a bright eyed lion cub personifies hope for the future of its species.

Dancing Manta Rays (throughout artwork) – inspired by a film entitled ‘Dancing Manta Rays’ by Mark Thorpe, drawings of manta rays appear throughout this piece and include a group of dancing manta rays layered through the central elephant’s ear. Hunted for their gill rakers to use in Chinese medicine the future of manta rays remains uncertain.

Pangolin (front leg of rhino) – the armoured body of a pangolin clings on to the walking rhino’s leg, suggesting the precarious status of pangolin species, racing towards extinction, caught for food and used in Chinese medicine. Tens of thousands of pangolin are traded every year.

South China Tigers, Mother, cubs & Male (back & front Rhino legs) when Jane began drawing ‘Rhino 2014’ in early summer the official number of wild tigers was less than 3500. By August the official number emerged as less than 3000 wild tigers. There are more tigers in captivity than in the wild. The small tiger cubs represent the future of tigers padding towards extinction, but ‘hope’ that it is possible not only to save wild tigers but all the species depicted in ‘Rhino 2014’.

Great White Sharks (layered through rhino body) – illustrates the grace of an enigmatic animal that has inhabited the earth for 500 million years. Sunlight flickering through the water, dances on the shark’s body, encouraging appreciation of the beauty and necessity of sharks in a bid to dispel their negative populist image. Shark finning for shark fin soup is rapidly depleting shark species populations; eleven species are endangered.”

'Rhino 2014', manta rays, tigers, pangolin and great white sharks details

‘Rhino 2014’, manta rays, tigers, pangolin and great white sharks details

Rhino 2014 will be used to raise funds for the inspirational Chengeta Wildlife working on the frontline to deter the trade of illegal wildlife products, protecting rhinos and elephants.

For further information about Mark Thorpe’s stellar film-making please visit Sea Wild Earth

'Pangolin' detail from 'Rhino 2014' by Jane Lee McCracken

‘Pangolin’ detail from ‘Rhino 2014’ by Jane Lee McCracken

‘War + Peace’, Selected Biro Drawings 2008 – 2014

'War + Peace', Selected Biro Drawings 2008 - 2014 by Jane Lee McCracken, Front Cover

‘War + Peace’, Selected Biro Drawings 2008 – 2014 Limited Edition Hardback Book by Jane Lee McCracken, 2014, Cover

Published today, I am delighted to say that 50 limited edition copies of my new book are now available.  Here is some information about ‘War + Peace’ and a look inside!

” ‘War + Peace’, by multimedia Artist Jane Lee McCracken brings together a selection of her intricate Biro drawings. This beautifully produced hardback book replicates every detail of Jane’s black and colour Biro drawings from several bodies of work spanning 6 years, including, ‘Tales from the East’, ‘The Woodcutter’s Cottage’, ‘In Homage to the Last Carnivores of Eurasia’ and her recent artwork for conservation projects. Inspired by her passion for childhood memoirs, fairy tales, travel, forests and animals and her continuing exploration of the themes of ‘war’ and ‘loss’, multimedia artist Jane makes multiplex, layered drawings in colour or black Biro, using her drawings as inspiration to create objects and installations.  Taking photographs of films and documentaries, her muse lily, people, animals and found objects as the foundation of her work, she builds complex layers of drawn images in Biro as if film still projections, resulting in monotone or colour abstracted pieces with an ethereal, cinematic quality.  Her aim is to make art that represents the beauty and brutal reality of life thus creating “memorials of lives lived, both human and animal and ways of life lost”. Evoking consideration of loss whether through war or disaster, her work draws upon empathy for the emotional or physical scars experienced by humans, animals or the environment.”

EDITION:

Limited Edition of 50 Hardback Books

Signed and numbered in gold with personal dedication option included

Original Gold Tiger Drawing produced in each copy

To purchase or for further information:

www.janeleemccracken.co.uk/shop/artbook

 Here is a taster of what’s inside! 

'War + Peace', Selected Biro Drawings 2008 - 2014, by Jane Lee McCracken, 'American Dream' 2014

‘American Dream’, ‘War + Peace’ 2014

 

'Our Forefathers' & 'Mummy Bear and Baby Bear', 'War + Peace', 2014

‘Our Forefathers’ & ‘Mummy Bear and Baby Bear’, ‘War + Peace’, 2014

'Butterfly Lover', 'War + Peace', 2014

‘Butterfly Lover’, ‘War + Peace’, 2014

'The Cupboard' & 'Sindy and the Troika', 'War + Peace', 2014

‘The Cupboard’ & ‘Sindy and the Troika’, ‘War + Peace’, 2014

'TV Screen II - Where Wolves and Bears Dare', 'War + Peace', 2014

‘TV Screen II – Where Wolves and Bears Dare’, ‘War + Peace’, 2014

'Shh, it's a Tiger!', 'War + Peace', 2014, Back Cover

‘Shh, it’s a Tiger!’, ‘War + Peace’, 2014, Back Cover

Original Gold Tiger Drawing in each book.

Original Gold Tiger Drawing in each book.

Dream the ‘American Dream’!

'American Dream', colour Biro drawing, 2014 by Jane Lee McCracken

‘American Dream’, 2014, colour Biro drawing, 60cm x 42 cm by Jane Lee McCracken

This year’s artwork for the Wolf Conservation Center, NY (WCC)‘American Dream’ has taken four months in the making.  Not only does it feature WCC wolves, Atka, Alawa, Zephyr and Nikai but it places wolves at the very heart of the Great American Wilderness highlighting the essential keystone species they are.

ABOUT ‘AMERICAN DREAM’

'American Dream', colour Biro drawing, 2014, detail - Zephyr

‘American Dream’, colour Biro drawing,  detail –  Zephyr

“Winter howls through Yellowstone National Park, sweeping across Ambassador wolf Zephyr’s fur.  An intrepid stag plunges through a deep blanket of snow, pursued by wolves, as a bison battles against a blizzard on the plains between the mountains.

'American Dream', colour Biro drawing, detail - Nikai and Monarch Butterfly

‘American Dream’, colour Biro drawing, detail – Nikai and Monarch Butterfly

A mountain bluebird heralds the arrival of spring, as a bear wakes from hibernation and a bison calf is caught in a spring shower, while Alpine flowers blossom on Zephyr’s legs. Summer shimmers on the wings of a monarch butterfly announcing the arrival of Nikai, the Wolf Conservation Center’s newest Ambassador. Nikai listens to the bluebird’s song as bison rut in a summer meadow.

'American Dream', colour Biro Drawing, detail - Zephyr and Alawa as pups and Atka leaping over a stream

‘American Dream’, colour Biro Drawing, detail – Zephyr and Alawa as pups and Atka leaping over a stream

Fall flickers over Zephyr, as a pup, and turns to winter over Alawa, also as a pup and the wolf pack led by Atka return to their winter trail.  Atka, the leader of the WCC Ambassador Pack, gleams like the sun on the wings of a monarch butterfly. He watches over Zephyr, Alawa, and Nikai in a landscape where wolves roam free.”

"American Dream', colour Biro drawing, detail - Atka and Monarch Butterfly

“American Dream’, colour Biro drawing, detail – Atka and Monarch Butterfly

MAKING  ‘AMERICAN DREAM’

I found inspiration for ‘American Dream’ from the BBC film “Yellowstone” (2009), taking hundreds of still photographs as the film played, searching for images that would best represent the wildlife that has inhabited North America for thousands of years. Also working with beautiful images of wolves taken by Rebecca Bose of the WCC, my aspiration was to try and capture the majesty of the center’s wolves.

Biro (ballpoint pen) is a difficult medium to work with.  There is no room for error as erasing is not possible, Biro blots meaning the nibs have to be constantly cleaned, also the colour range is limited resulting in most colours being mixed directly within the drawing to achieve the palette required.  Making a drawing of this scale therefore takes several months.  But the result is colours of such vibrancy and depth that resemble pigment inks whilst working with the age old technique of ‘drawing’, that still remains with us since the earliest art produced by man, millennia ago.

Ultimately the aim of this artwork was to create a piece that presents wolves as a keystone species while evoking the timeless beauty of the American landscape. Monarch butterflies appear in the drawing highlighting that they too are a vulnerable species, their epic North American migration to Mexico now under threat. The spectrum of colors applied in the drawing reflect the beauty of our natural world, while the dominance of red, white, and blue suggest American traditions and resound ‘hope’ that wolves and other wildlife are thriving again through the inspirational work of organizations such as WCC which dream the ‘American Dream’ and are making it a reality!

‘American Dream’ will be auctioned at this year’s WCC ‘Wine & Wolves’ Holiday Celebration Event on 4th December, with all profits raised going directly to WCC.

Limited Edition Prints

EDITIONS

20 A2 (same size as the original drawing) limited edition signed and numbered archival pigment prints

50 A3 limited edition signed and numbered archival pigment prints

are now available:

www.janeleemccracken.co.uk/shop/conservation art prints

All profits from each print sale go directly to WCC for their vital work conserving wolves.

Wishing Atka, Alawa, Zephyr, Nikai and all at WCC a wonderful ‘Wine & Wolves’!

Photo Credit: Rebecca Bose, WCC

Photo Credit: Rebecca Bose, WCC

 

 

 

Postcard logo back

THE LEGEND OF THE LAST SOUTH CHINA TIGER: PART ONE

'Yin and Yang', black and neon orange Biro drawing by Jane Lee McCracken

‘Yin and Yang’, black and neon orange Biro drawing by Jane Lee McCracken

THE LEGEND OF THE LAST SOUTH CHINA TIGER

(Written especially for SAVE WILD TIGERS The Legend of the Last South China Tiger  accompanies a drawing diptych, of which the second drawing has been donated to Save Wild Tigers and will be exhibited alongside the work of 20 inspirational artists, curated by Lauren Baker, in ‘THRIVE’ Exhibition, Sanderson Hotel, London, 14th – 19th May and auctioned at the Mango Tree Tiger Dinner, 20th May)

 

Yin and Yang’, Drawing One

And so the legend of the last wild South China tiger begins …

Under the constellation of the White Tiger of the West, protected by the sacred Tigress Warriors of Yin, the last wild South China tiger cub, Amoy cowers behind the most powerful of the Tigress Warriors. Amoy can hear the reverberation of horses’ hooves coming closer. In the East under the constellation of the Azure Dragon, the warriors of Yang ride out in search of Amoy. Clouds of dust raised by the galloping cavalry form Goddesses of Love in the sky, anticipating his capture, for the Azure Dragon prizes the bones of the White Tiger’s children. Misguidedly he thinks tiger parts cure disease and heighten passion and has slain Amoy’s relatives one by one.   But the Tigress Warriors are brave and fearless and their swords are sharp. Amoy’s eyes widen with fear as the cavalry draws closer…

Part Two of the legend and the second drawing will be revealed soon…

There are less than 3500 tigers left in the wild and thought to be no South China Tigers surviving in the wild.  But the inspirational SAVE WILD TIGERS UK charity is working tirelessly to save the last remaining wild tigers.  Join them today and help save wild tigers!

20 limited edition archival pigment prints of the second donated drawing, made by Jack Lowe Studio will be available from 14th May with ALL profits donated to Save Wild Tigers.  ‘South China Tiger’ diptych will be released later this year as part of my fine China limited edition plate series “In Homage to the Last Great Carnivores of Eurasia” to celebrate the majesty of tigers and highlight their decline through wildlife crime.

‘THRIVE’ an Inspirational Exhibition for SAVE WILD TIGERS!

 

'Shh, it's a Tiger!', luxury fine English china plate by Jane Lee McCracken

‘Shh, it’s a Tiger!’,  Siberian Tiger, ‘In Homage to the Last Great Carnivores of Eurasia’, luxury fine English china plate by Jane Lee McCracken made by THE NEW ENGLISH, Stoke-on-Trent

On 20th May 2014 Save Wild Tigers, an incredible organisation dedicated to saving the worlds last remaining wild tigers will be holding an auction dinner of tiger inspired artwork at the Mango Tree, London.  ‘THRIVE’, a unique and inspirational exhibition of this artwork, made by 20 artists will be shown from 14th – 19th May at the Sanderson Hotel, London.

SJGC1484_SWT_ArtEx_Flyer_A5_v4.indd

I feel exceptionally privileged that a new piece of work made specially for Save Wild Tigers will be exhibited in THRIVE alongside a group of amazing artists and their tiger artwork, curated by exceptional multimedia artist Lauren Baker.

When I was a wee girl tigers were already endangered.  In the mid 1970s after reading that the Caspian Tiger was thought to be extinct I wrote to a company whose advertising campaigns featured a tiger, to ask if they were helping save tigers.  It seemed logical to a child that if a company used an endangered animal in its advertising they must be donating some of their profit to conserve tigers.  I didn’t receive a reply.  By the time the company was donating towards tiger conservation in the 1990s, I was driving tube trains on the Northern Line and still hoping I could do something to help wild tigers.  After all how can we look ourselves in the mirror as a species if we don’t try to save one of the most beautiful and iconic animals on the planet.

Save Wild Tigers is a incredibly innovative organisation who work tirelessly to raise funds which “go directly to targeted and critical tiger conservation projects that make a real difference” including the Born Free Foundation and the Environmental Investigation Agency.  Save Wild Tigers actively encourage people to get involved in helping to save tigers – from artists and other creatives to tiny tigers of our younger generations.

'Shh, it's a Tiger!' and 'Bang!', Siberian tiger luxury fine china plate diptych by Jane Lee McCracken

‘Shh, it’s a Tiger!’ and ‘Bang!’, Siberian tiger “In Homage to the Last Great Carnivores of Eurasia” luxury fine china plate diptych by Jane Lee McCracken made by THE NEW ENGLISH, Stoke-on-Trent

Since pledging the second Biro drawing in a new diptych of South China Tigers for the next two plates in my ceramics series, I have written my own tiger legend especially for Save Wild Tigers.  The drawing will be revealed after the exhibition opening.  A luxury limited edition series of 20 archival pigment prints of the drawing made by master printmaker Jack Lowe Studio will be available to purchase with ALL profits donated to Save Wild Tigers.  Plates No.1 of ‘Shh, it’s a Tiger!’ and ‘Bang!’ will also be auctioned on the 20th of May.

Thank you Save Wild Tigers for all your hard work saving tigers and for including my work in your inspirational exhibition!

'Our Forefathers' and ''Our Loss', Amur Leopard 'In Homage to the Last Great Carnivores of Eurasia', luxury fine English china plate series by Jane Lee McCracken